Lillian’s Law

Back in 2010 on the 26th of June, young Lillian Groves was hit by a car and unfortunately died later in hospital. The police found cannabis in the driver’s blood and a half smoked joint on the dashboard but the driver was only sentenced to 8 months in prison due to the driver only being tested for drugs 9 hours after the incident, at which point the levels of drugs in his system was not enough to prosecute under causing death by careless driving while under the influence of drugs.

Backed by the Croydon Advertiser, Lillian’s parents are calling for the government to change the law and procedures which deal with drivers under the influence of drugs.

It would include rolling out a drug test kit which can be used in the field. This is to attempt to catch and prevent drug using road users, who are involved in as many as 1 out 5 road deaths. These test kits are already widely used in Australia and United States of America.

Read more and sign the petition >

The Broken Clavicle – The Road to Recovery

I’ve had my operation and I stayed in hospital for a few days after as I was in quite a bit of pain and had troubles moving.

Staying in hospital overnight has to be one of the worst experiences of my life. I was in a room with 5 other men, all of us recovering from operations. During the day it’s fine but atnight time it’s awful, just imagine 5 men snoring loudly all night long, the guy next to me sounded as if he was drowning! One of them kept calling for the nurse, who was often busy with someone else in a different room. I got very little sleep whilst I was in hospital 🙁
I was in the cadets at school and on several occasions we spent weekends at military bases and that meant sleeping in barracks with 20 other teenagers trying to play tricks on each other, I got more sleep then!

It’s been two weeks since the operation and I can safely say I’m feeling a lot better! Still in pain and discomfort but I’m moving around better.

I’ve also had two physio sessions so far, god that is agony at first! But I’m slowly getting movement back in my arm. Unfortunately due to me holding my arm in one position for two weeks due to really bad pain, my arm is really stiff and it will need a lot of work to get moving again.

How long till I’m back on the bike? Hard to say at the moment, I can see my see my self being off for at least a month, I’m not going to rush to get back on the road, any knock on it could make things worse, as soon as i can get back on the bike I will be on the turbo!

The Broken Clavicle Part III

It’s 6.15am, I’m up getting ready to go to the hospital for my operation. I was told nil by mouth from midnight, so no pain killers for me this morning!

I arrive at my designated ward at 6.50am, 10 minutes early. Sign in and take a seat, I’m on the trauma list as an emergency patient. Less than 4 of us on that list. I noted when I took my seat that there where about 6 of us in the waiting room.

As time goes by, plenty of people arrive in the waiting room, all of them looking comfortable and showing no signs of pain, unlike my self, I’m in agony. Even with painkillers sitting down had been painful! Without them breathing is painful!

We asked the nurses several times what was going on, told them the pain I was in and thatI was having troubles breathing. NOTHING happened, they didn’t care and told us nothing. Eventually we get through to someone after 2 hours and I’m seen by myanaesthetist who quickly got me some pain killers and rushed me through the process. Before that everyone else in the waiting room had been seen some time before me, several of them a few times. That isn’t exactly what you expect when you are a ‘trauma’ patient and the only one showing any sign of pain.

4 Hours later and I’m on the operating table and I don’t even remember getting an injection. I just remember coming too in recovery and shortly later being taken to a ward to recover.

So far I’ve been let down by the health service at several points. I was told in A&E that there was no way they would operate on such a break and that it was fairly simple. Instead of having the A&E Consultant doctor give a medical opinion, I would have rather had an orthopaedic doctor come and give their opinion, then I might have saved nearly 2 weeks of pain and discomfort and I wouldn’t need so much physio.
And when I was waiting for my surgery I was told to come in for 7 without taking any painkillers despite my injury and then had to wait for several hours before I was seen. Again not impressed. If I have any kind of injury like this again then I’m not sure I can go to my local NHS hospital and it crossed my mind in the waiting room on the morning of the surgery, I was very tempted to walk away and go and get booked in at a private hospital, as I doubt I would get treated in the same way! And I know I would be seen by the same doctors.