Limited road space

With road space being a limitation in-built up cities, selfish road users who slow everyone else down are becoming a real problem. Using the road two abreast, slowing others down, causing traffic etc….

Those bloody car drivers need to be sorted out. The two person wide vehicle which is often seen with only a driver, takes up more space than they need to on the roads. Thus causing traffic and preventing the faster moving road users on more suitable width vehicles from using the road as efficiently as they could do.

I always find it amusing when someone comments that cyclists hold up traffic and how they should all get cars. What they can’t see is that a bicycle is one less car, and a bike is a hell of a lot easier to overtake.

Who stole all the road space?

Above is the road space that 60 people require when traveling by bus, bicycle and car. Quite clearly the cars take up a hell of a lot more space, the bus takes up the least but all people most travel to the same dictation or stay on the bus till they get near to their destination. The bicycle takes up a little more than the bus but much less than the cars, users are able to travel to their destinations individually.

Why do we still cater for such inefficient private transportation in cities?

Croydon’s Urban Motorways

As someone who has lived in or around Croydon all my life, I’ve never really noticed it before. That is until it was drawn to my attention by this post.

The post on As Easy As Riding A Bike is looking at a well-known cycling facility on Wellesly road. One that was in fact so bad on the first attempt, it was partially removed and modified. The post mentions how Wellesly road looks very similar to that of a motorway, several lanes of fast-moving traffic, no places for pedestrians to cross and some busses and trams thrown in for good measure. Standing back a little and it clearly divides the town centre in two. On one side you have central Croydon’s shopping plazas and entertainment areas and on the other you have a mass of office buildings, the busy east Croydon train station, Croydon Collage and the Fairfield Halls.

This isn’t the only road in Croydon that has similarities with a motorway. There are several flyovers and multilane roads that were designed in the 1950’s to help motor traffic move quickly from one area to the next. We have Roman Way, Croydon Flyover and The Purley Way for example. None of these roads have speed limits greater than 40mph and like all other speed limits, they are rarely obeyed by motorised traffic.

Roads like Wellesly Road and Purley Way are the kind which today should be very much avoided. They provide a fast and easy route though a busy area, taking away crossings for  pedestrians and providing traffic with the fastest route from A to B. The direct traffic flow with little traffic lights and long sight lines means vehicles travel much faster than they should and provide a dangerous situation for anybody who choose to travel by bicycle.

The centre of the town is pretty much surrounded by these kind of roads and it makes crossing the town by bicycle a difficult and sometimes unpleasant experience. If you have knowledge of the town there are various rat runs you can take to avoid said roads, but they usually involve crossing tram lines at tight angles or cycling through infrastructure which is not maintained.

TFL’s plans for Blackfriars bridge can be compared to these roads, hostile places for everyone that isn’t surrounded by metal, not pleasant to look at or use and certainly not inviting for clean modes of transportation.